OLOL College

News — Faculty & Staff

New Board of Trustee Leader Named

Baton Rouge, LA – Alden L. Andre, a member of the College’s Board of Trustees since 2010, has been named Board of Trustee Chair for Our Lady of the Lake College.  Mr. Andre, a native and resident of Pointe Coupee Parish in Louisiana, completed his Bachelor of Science at Louisiana State University then served for a number of years in the U.S. Army.  During his fifty year career in plastics manufacturing he held various managerial positions at the Baton Rouge Formosa Plastics corporation and established two sister company plant sites in Pointe Coupee Parish.  Mr. Andre has served on numerous Boards of Directors including the Baton Rouge Chamber of Commerce, the Louisiana Chemical Association and the Capital Area United Way.

Other current Board leadership includes Redfield Bryan, M.D. who serves as the Board’s Vice-Chair. 

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About Our Lady of the Lake College

Offering doctoral, master’s, baccalaureate, and associate degrees, Our Lady of the Lake College is a four-year, independent Catholic institution, providing a strong foundation in the liberal arts and continuing its highly-regarded health sciences and nursing programs.  Established in 1923 as a nursing school by the Franciscan Missionaries of Our Lady (FMOL), Our Lady of the Lake College holds to a Franciscan tradition of service, offering a healing and spiritual presence for the community and especially those most in need.  To learn more about Our Lady of the Lake College, please visit www.ololcollege.edu.


Professor of Nursing Receives National Recognitions

Baton Rouge, LA – Lisa Skemp, PhD, RN, Professor of Nursing at Our Lady of the Lake College, has recently received recognition from two national academic organizations, the American Academy of Nursing and the Gerontological Society of America. 

During the American Academy of Nursing’s Transforming Health, Driving Policy Conference on October 18, 2014, in Washington, DC., Dr. Skemp was inducted as a American Academy of Nursing Fellow, an award that recognizes individuals for their leadership in education, management, and policy focused on improving health.  Being named an Academy fellow is a prestigious honor that is, according to the American Academy of Nursing selection criteria, based on the “extent the nominee’s nursing career has influenced health policies and the health and wellbeing of all.”   

Academy fellows represent all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and 24 countries.  In the 2014 class of 168 nurse leaders, Dr. Skemp was the only individual inducted from the state of Louisiana.

Additionally, during the Gerontological Society of America (GSA) Annual Scientific meeting held on November 5-9, 2014 in Washington, DC, Dr. Skemp was awarded GSA fellow status.  GSA fellowship is peer recognition for outstanding contributions to the field of gerontology.  This distinction recognizes activities that include research, teaching, administration, and public service.

Dr. Skemp, who serves as Our Lady of the Lake College’s Sister Agnes Marie Fitzsimons Endowed Chair of Gerontological Nursing, organizes interdisciplinary participation in gerontological study and encourages student involvement in gerontology practice and research.  She draws upon her experience as a nurse scholar to promote health and quality of life for elders by encouraging regional research collaborations and conducting domestic and international research related to healthy aging.  

Offering doctoral, master’s, baccalaureate, and associate degrees, Our Lady of the Lake College is a four-year, independent Catholic institution, providing a strong foundation in the liberal arts and continuing its highly-regarded health sciences and nursing programs.  Established in 1923 as a nursing school by the Franciscan Missionaries of Our Lady (FMOL), Our Lady of the Lake College holds to a Franciscan tradition of service, offering a healing and spiritual presence for the community and especially those most in need. 


For additional information, please call Elaine Crowe, OLOL College Communications, at 225-768-1700.


Ebola Information

COLLEGE UPDATE ON EBOLA
From the Office of Health & Safety
October, 2014

What is Ebola

Ebola is a rare disease caused by infection with one of the Ebola virus strains. There are no known cases in Louisiana. Early symptoms include fever greater than 101.5, severe headache, muscle pain, weakness, diarrhea, vomiting, stomach pain, and unexplained bleeding or bruising. According to the CDC symptoms appear within two to 21 days of exposure to the virus.

Persons at risk and virus transmission

Those at risk are anyone who has traveled to West Africa in the past three weeks and believes they were in contact with body fluids of someone ill with Ebola.  Healthcare providers caring for Ebola patients and the family and friends in close contact with Ebola patients are at the highest risk of getting sick because they may come in contact with the blood or body fluids of sick patients. Body fluids include blood, sweat, urine, feces, saliva and possibly nasal secretions if close to the infected person. The virus cannot be transmitted through the air, through water or through food. It can only be transmitted through fluids of an infected person or from exposure to contaminated objects – such as needles. 

How to monitor for symptoms and when to seek health care

Any person with recent international travel to affected areas should monitor their health status for three weeks after arrival from West Africa. Taking your temperature once or twice daily might be helpful. If you have traveled to West Africa and develop sudden fever, chills, muscle aches, severe diarrhea, vomiting, rash or other symptoms consistent with Ebola, you should seek immediate medical attention.

Before visiting a health-care provider, alert the clinic or emergency room in advance about your possible exposure to Ebola virus so that arrangements can be made to prevent spreading it to others. When traveling to a health-care provider, limit contact with other people and avoid all other travel.

Ways to prevent illness

Ebola virus is transmitted by close contact of the body fluids of a person who has symptoms of Ebola. Treat any body fluid as though it is infectious. Blood or body fluids can spread Ebola if they get into your eyes, nose or mouth. Therefore, hand washing is the most important infection-control measure, along with avoiding hand contact to one’s face. Wear disposable impermeable gloves when cleaning visibly contaminated surfaces. Maintain good healthy practices like getting plenty of sleep, maintaining good nutrition, drinking plenty of water and increasing your physical activity to help your immune system best resist infections.

International surveillance

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the World Health Organization (WHO) continue to monitor and respond to the Ebola virus outbreak in West Africa and according to the CDC, Ebola currently poses no significant threat in the United States.

The federal government has not issued travel bans to these areas. If anyone does arrive in the US from the affected areas they will receive information about how they should monitor their health during the next few weeks.

Additionally, OLOL College has no international students from Guinea, Liberia or Sierra Leone. There are no College-sponsored trips where students or faculty are coming to campus from the affected West African countries.

Ebola preparedness in Louisiana

First and foremost, there are no known cases of Ebola in Louisiana. However, if there ever was a case in our state, Louisiana is prepared. For the last several weeks, the Department of Health & Hospitals has been working to ready Louisiana's public health and medical infrastructure, including procedures for emergency medical workers, hospital physicians and regional emergency response coordinators.

  • DHH has distributed information to health care providers in the state including criteria for suspecting Ebola, how to report suspected cases, how to consult with DHH or seek lab testing, and necessary precautions to be taken.
  • DHH recently updated its routine hospital bed availability survey to capture information regarding infectious disease treatment capabilities and ensure proper facilities are ready should a case present in Louisiana.
  • DHH has met with EMS and hospital regional coordinators around the state to specifically discuss plans for responding to a potential Ebola case.

Our Lady of the Lake’s infection prevention protocols were specifically updated regarding the Ebola virus in early August. Their teams and physicians are up to date on the most current surveillance and national alerts from the CDC and are using the CDC checklist to ensure appropriate strategies are in place for isolating Ebola patients should the need arise. 

Protecting Healthcare Workers

Refer to http://www.cdc.gov/vhf/ebola/hcp/index.html includes information on the Sequence for Putting On and Removing Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) and Tools for Protecting Healthcare Personnel 

Facts and resources

More  information is available from the CDC and World Health Organization


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